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  • N/NY-TR6142 - EMDR and Art Therapy: Transforming Negative Cognitions into a Positive Tomorrow

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This presentation discusses the use of art making to enhance the experience of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). Connecting art and EMDR is a creative and effective way to enhance emotional regulation and rapidly reduce symptoms related to trauma; it is useful with a wide range of populations and issues

    Description

    This presentation discusses the use of art making to enhance the experience of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). Connecting art and EMDR is a creative and effective way to enhance emotional regulation and rapidly reduce symptoms related to trauma; it is useful with a wide range of populations and issues.

    Learning Objectives
      1. Participants will be able to name at least three basic concepts of EMDR including safe place, container, and bilateral stimulation.
      2. Participants will be able to identify at least five art therapy directives that support the basic concepts of EMDR.
      3. Participants will be able to list the requirements for EMDR training and certification.

      Katelyn Brewer

      Katelyn Brewer MS, ATR, LPC is a youth and family counselor and art therapist at a crisis shelter in Kansas City. She primarily works with homeless and runaway youth as well as victims of family violence. Katie is an advocate for the LGBT community and is passionate about helping youth.

      Sherri Jacobs

      Sherri received her master’s degree in art therapy from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and received her master’s degree in marriage and family therapy from Friends University in Kansas City. She has worked for many years as an art therapist with children, adolescents, elderly and people with dementia. Sherri is founder of Heartland Art Therapy at the InterUrban ArtHouse in Overland Park, Kansas. She is the past president of the Kansas Art Therapy Association, 2014 recipient of the AATA distinguished service award, TEDxOverlandPark found/organizer, and has held numerous civic leadership positions. Sherri is on the faculty of Avila University in Kansas City.

    1. N/NY-TR6153 - Examining Historical Trauma: The Epigenetics of Communities and Why Intersectionality Matters

      Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

      Trauma is a large topic within the mental health profession, yet discussions often omit historical trauma. An examination of historical trauma will be presented as well as an analytic look at treatments and their connections to oppressive practice. A proposal for ethical work with historical traumas will be shared.

      Description

      Trauma is a large topic within the mental health profession, yet discussions often omit historical trauma. An examination of historical trauma will be presented as well as an analytic look at treatments and their connections to oppressive practice. A proposal for ethical work with historical traumas will be shared.

      Learning Objectives
      1. Participants will be able to define historical trauma, intergenerational trauma, and epigenetics.
      2. Participants will be able to identify three oppressive practices used in contemporary trauma treatment as well as three ways in which they can practice trauma-informed work in an intersectional, historically-respectful manner.
      3. Participants will identify three benefits of using a community-driven, collaborative model of care.

      Melanie Heindl

      Melanie Heindl, MS, ATR, LPC is an art therapist from Milwaukee, Wisconsin currently serving as a Clinical Services Supervisor in an outpatient mental health clinic. Melanie specializes in developmental and complex traumas, working specifically with youth and their families involved in juvenile justice and child welfare. She is a doctoral student at Mount Mary University, where she serves as adjunct faculty in the graduate art therapy department. She received her Masters at Mount Mary in 2012. Her current work focuses on anti-oppressive trauma focused practice.

    2. N/NY-TR6174 - Applying the Sanctuary Model® to Therapy with Children and Adolescents

      Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This presentation will explore applications of the Sanctuary model®, a trauma-informed model of treatment, and one of its core aspects – the SELF compass – as a useful framework for guiding outpatient therapy with children and adolescents who have experienced trauma and other difficult life circumstances.

      Description

      This presentation will explore applications of the Sanctuary model®, a trauma-informed model of treatment, and one of its core aspects – the SELF compass – as a useful framework for guiding outpatient therapy with children and adolescents who have experienced trauma and other difficult life circumstances.

      Learning Objectives
      1. Participants will be able to delineate at least 3 of the 5 shared assumptions of the Sanctuary model® and identify the 3 historical precursors to the development of the model.
      2. Participants will be able to define the 4 components of the Sanctuary® "SELF" compass relative to their meaning for clients within the context of treatment.
      3. Participants will be able to describe 3 creative approaches to using the “SELF” compass in therapy in targeting key areas of recovery for children and adolescents who have experienced trauma.

      Rebecca Miller

      Rebecca Miller, MA, ATR-BC, LCAT, CCLS, is a nationally registered and board certified art therapist. She is an Assistant Professor of Art Therapy at Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College and is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision at the University of Missouri-St. Louis

    3. NY-AU6208 - Glass Arts as Therapeutic Medium in Art Therapy

      Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

      Art therapists rarely employ glass as therapeutic medium. Some art therapists have actively discouraged use of glass. Literature suggests that this may be due to lack of understanding and familiarity rather than inappropriateness of the medium. This presentation explores the use of glass fusion and glass blowing as therapeutic mediums.

      Description

      Art therapists rarely employ glass as therapeutic medium. Some art therapists have actively discouraged use of glass. Literature suggests that this may be due to lack of understanding and familiarity rather than inappropriateness of the medium. This presentation explores the use of glass fusion and glass blowing as therapeutic mediums.

      Learning Objectives
      1. Participants will be able to name 3 ways in which glass fusion can serve as therapeutic medium in art therapy
      2. Participants will be able to name 3 ways in which glass blowing can serve as therapeutic medium in art therapy
      3. Participants will be able to name a minimum of 2 benefits and 2 contraindications for use of glass in art therapy

      Dr. Jessica Stallings

      Program Therapist and Adjunct Professor, Emporia State University

      Dr. Jessica Stallings, ATR-BC, LMHP taught at Emporia State University, worked in private practice, and is currently working in partial hospitalization with children ages 5 to 12. She completed a dissertation on using popular culture with individuals with ASDs.

      Stephanie Clark

      Stephanie Clark, MA, ATR-BC, LCPC, LSOTP is Child & Family Art Therapist for Children's Research Triangle, a community non-profit organization in the Chicago area. Stephanie provides art therapy services in schools and community settings to children, teens, and families who've experienced trauma and other adverse events.

    4. NY-ES9033 - Creating an Art Therapy Training Program: Cultural and Ethical Pitfalls and Successes

      Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This panel will present a case example of creating the first art therapy master’s program in a country in Eastern Europe. It will detail the initial vision, creation of curriculum, navigation of the country’s educational regulations, commencement of the program, and pitfalls and successes of the first year and cohort.

      Description

      This panel will present a case example of creating the first art therapy master’s program in a country in Eastern Europe. It will detail the initial vision, creation of curriculum, navigation of the country’s educational regulations, commencement of the program, and pitfalls and successes of the first year and cohort.

      Learning Objectives
      1. Understand the importance of guidelines and define the four lenses for creating art therapy training programs
      2. Identify the cultural and ethical aspects of which to plan for and be cognizant
      3. Comprehend the pitfalls and successes from differing perspectives

      Heidi Bardot

      Heidi Bardot, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT, Director of the Art Therapy Graduate Program at The George Washington University in Washington, DC. She is a licensed, registered, board certified art therapist and has created service-learning programs in India, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, and Croatia, and assisted in creating a post-master’s program in Croatia. She has collaborated with organizations to train relief workers in art techniques, self-care, and trauma. Bardot has published and presented internationally on refugee and war trauma, resiliency, grief, ethics, and international education.

      Jasmina Pacek

      Jasmina Pacek, MFA, associate professor of art, Vice Dean of The Academy of Arts in Osijek Croatia. Internationally trained: BDes from Republic of Ireland, MFA from the US, and currently pursuing Doctorate research and Art therapy postgraduate studies in Croatia, has a goal to bridge multicultural gap and create international connections in higher education

      Mia Janković Shentser

      Mia Janković Shentser is an artist in search of sense of inner and outer visual world through understanding the ancient and contemporary symbolism—a source of meanings of common ideas. As an art educator she commits to strengthen the creative powers and find a healing direction in art making.

    5. NY-PP6022 - Evidence Based Practice, Legal Issues, & Digital Apps

      Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

      Evidence-based practice, apps, online treatment, and legal issues will be reviewed in this case that influenced two lawyers, a law guardian, and judge to determine visitation outcome in this complicated Child Protective Service case.

      Description

      Evidence-based practice, apps, online treatment, and legal issues will be reviewed in this case that influenced two lawyers, a law guardian, and judge to determine visitation outcome in this complicated Child Protective Service case.

      Learning Objectives
      1. Participants will understand the BetterMind Health app, range of applications available for assessing patient function and how to utilize this tool to chart outcomes and change over time
      2. Participants will learn how to write up reports embedding information derived from the Better Mind Health app into reports, updates and treatment plans
      3. Participants will learn how to write up reports embedding information that can be presented in legal situations admissible to court

      Dr. Ellen Horovitz

      Ellen G. Horovitz, PhD, LCAT, ATR-BC, E-RYT, LFYP, C-IAYT is in private practice, Creative Arts Therapy Practice, PLLC. She has authored over 8 books, is a registered art therapist, yoga teacher and certified yoga therapist.

    6. NY-PP6076 - Positive Art Therapy Demystified: Myths, FAQs, and New Directions

      Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This presentation will examine persistent myths about positive psychology and outline the ongoing relevance that it holds for the field of art therapy. Art therapy’s unique contributions to well-being will be discussed. Clinical and ethical considerations for integrating the two fields will be explored

      Description

      This presentation will examine persistent myths about positive psychology and outline the ongoing relevance that it holds for the field of art therapy. Art therapy’s unique contributions to well-being will be discussed. Clinical and ethical considerations for integrating the two fields will be explored

      Learning Objectives
        1. Attendees will be able to identify five myths and corrective facts about positive psychology
        2. Attendees with be able to list five qualities that differentiate positive psychology from psychology-as-usual
        3. Attendees will be able to identify five ways that positive art therapy integrates positive psychology with art therapy

        Rebecca Wilkinson

        Cofounder, Creative Wellbeing Workshops, LLC

        Rebecca Wilkinson, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT is co-founder of Creative Wellbeing Workshops, LLC which provides individuals and organizations with training and resources for managing stress, preventing burnout and increasing wellbeing. She is co-author of Positive art therapy theory and practice: Integrating positive psychology with art therapy and teaches on the topic at the George Washington University’s Graduate Art Therapy Program. She serves as a Wellness Counselor and Art Therapy Specialist for half of the month at Miraval Resort in AZ and returns to DC the other half to maintain her private practice and be with family.

        Dr. Gioia Chilton

        Gioia Chilton, Ph.D., ATR-BC, LCPAT has taught art therapy internationally, and currently conducts art therapy near Washington, DC with active duty military in collaboration with Creative Forces. She is the co-author of the book, Positive Psychology in Art Therapy: Integrating Wellbeing into Theory and Practice, published by Routledge in 2018.

      1. NY-RE6083 - When Past, Present and Future Collide: A Typology for Art Therapy Research

        Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

        This paper will explore a typology for art therapy research that integrates past research, with present study methods, while helping to enhance future research agendas. Audience members will contribute their experience and expertise to discuss how this typology can be used effectively in teaching and practicing art therapy research.

        Description

        This paper will explore a typology for art therapy research that integrates past research, with present study methods, while helping to enhance future research agendas. Audience members will contribute their experience and expertise to discuss how this typology can be used effectively in teaching and practicing art therapy research.

        Learning Objectives
        1. Attendees will be able to articulate current dilemmas in art therapy research
        2. Attendees will be able to identify specific questions that are crucial in developing future art therapy studies
        3. Attendees will be able to comprehend strategies for addressing significant questions needed to further the field

        Dr. Theresa Van Lith

        Associate Professor and Clinical Coordinator, Florida State University

        Dr. Van Lith’s (ATR-BC, AThR) research interests have stemmed from working in the mental health system back in her home country, Australia. She has since investigated art therapy professional development and service delivery models in the United States, such as implementing best practice interventions with children and using web-based art therapy with university students.

      2. NY-SC5136 - How Museums Help Build Dementia Inclusive Communities

        Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

        A museum educator and two art therapists share about their arts-based, community-focused programming and how they enable their respective spaces be dementia inclusive. Join us and learn how you can build dementia inclusive spaces in your community through community partnerships and other avenues of connection.

        Description

        A museum educator and two art therapists share about their arts-based, community-focused programming and how they enable their respective spaces be dementia inclusive. Join us and learn how you can build dementia inclusive spaces in your community through community partnerships and other avenues of connection.

        Learning Objectives
        1. Participants will be able to describe 3 benefits individuals with dementia and their care partners can gain from arts-based programming in museums
        2. Attendees will be able to name 3 potential spaces in a community that can be used for arts-based, community focused programming
        3. Participants will be able to identify 3 approaches to reaching out and making new community connections with local businesses, organizations, and other groups

        Erika Hamlett

        Founder and Director of Creative Spark Art Therapy, a community and private art therapy practice. Her community work includes being an Arts Action Team member for Dementia Inclusive Durham, as well as a partnership with The Nasher as resident Art therapist and consultant for Reflections: The Nasher Museum’s Alzheimer’s Program.

        Emery Mikel

        Founder and Director, Water & Stone

        Emery H. Mikel, MA, ATR-BC, LCAT, LCPAT provided studio art therapy to the elderly and people living with dementia throughout the Washington, DC area until her relocation to Huntington, NY. She created and conducted her own contract service with 15-20 retirement homes. She studied Transpersonal Art Therapy at Naropa University. She is the founder and director of Water & Stone: a transpersonal and contemplative creative arts therapy collective. She also mentors therapists, supervises interns, and guest lectures at George Washington University and Nazareth College. She received her MA in Transpersonal Counseling Psychology: Art Therapy from Naropa University in Boulder,CO.

        Jessica Ruhle

        Director of Education and Public Programs at Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Ruhle leads Reflections, the museum’s Alzheimer’s program, and all public programs. She is a board member for the NC Alzheimer’s Association and was named 2014 Museum Educator of the Year by the NC Art Education Association.

      3. PP6234 - Building Creative Partnerships: From Vision to Reality Through Creative Business Partnerships

        Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

        In society, it is not unusual to hear of businesses partnering with each other. However, as art therapists, we are rarely prepared to create partnerships with businesses as easily as they do. As the future of art therapy practice continues to evolve, our options may demand more creative ways to find new jobs. This presentation will focus on skills and strategies to develop business partnerships.

        Description

        In society, it is not unusual to hear of businesses partnering with each other. However, as art therapists, we are rarely prepared to create partnerships with businesses as easily as they do. As the future of art therapy practice continues to evolve, our options may demand more creative ways to find new jobs. This presentation will focus on skills and strategies to develop business partnerships.

        Learning Objectives
        1. Participants will be able to identify 3 business skills to develop a business partnership
        2. Participants will be able to identify 3 business components which parallel art therapists role or function
        3. Participants will be able to identify 3 benefits of creating a business partnerships

        Charlotte Boston

        Charlotte G. Boston, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT, has provided art therapy services to psychiatric inpatients of all ages for more than 29 years, including the military. She served on AATA committees and the AATA Board of Directors. She has presented and published in art therapy. She is President-elect of the Art Therapy Credentials Board.