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  • N/NY-0109 - Utilizing Art Materials Within Sensorimotor Psychotherapy for Attachment Trauma

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This course explores the utilization of art materials within sensorimotor psychotherapy for the resolution of attachment trauma. A case study of an arts-based research project utilizing the heuristic method of inquiry is reviewed. Research process, emergent themes and potentials for further research are highlighted.

    Description

    This course explores the utilization of art materials within sensorimotor psychotherapy for the resolution of attachment trauma. A case study of an arts-based research project utilizing the heuristic method of inquiry is reviewed. Research process, emergent themes and potentials for further research are highlighted.

    Learning Objectives
      1. Identify at least two methods in which art making can be incorporated into trauma-informed sensorimotor psychotherapy.
      2. Describe at least three ways in which therapeutic attunement affected treatment outcomes.
      3. Describe two methods of arts-based analysis utilized in the research process.

      Lorena Snodgrass

      Lorena Snodgrass, MA, LMFT, IMFT, ATR-BC is an alumnus of the Clinical Art Therapy program at Loyola Marymount University. She engages the public in art therapy in in a variety of ways and specializes in working with adolescents, bereavement, and individuals that have experienced trauma.

    1. N/NY-0110 - Effects of Art Therapy Interventions for Chronic Pain and Psychosocial Comorbidities

      Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

      Chronic pain is a phenomenological experience, shaped by biopsychosocial factors. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a multidimensional, manualized art therapy intervention on participants' perceptions of chronic pain and psychosocial comorbidities. Overall findings support art therapy as a useful adjunct to traditional chronic-pain treatment.

      Description

      Chronic pain is a phenomenological experience, shaped by biopsychosocial factors. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a multidimensional, manualized art therapy intervention on participants' perceptions of chronic pain and psychosocial comorbidities. Overall findings support art therapy as a useful adjunct to traditional chronic-pain treatment.

      Learning Objectives
        1. Implement an alternative or complementary chronic pain treatment approach that could be used in therapy settings and alongside traditional pain management regimens.
        2. Identify influential factors in pain perception and relevant therapeutic strategies that can be used to address such factors.
        3. Recognize the multidimensional quality of illness, along with common psychosocial conditions that accompany a diagnosis of chronic pain.

        Dr. Molly O’Neill Haaga

        Assistant Professor, Ursuline College

        Dr. Molly O’Neill Haaga, Phd, ATR, LPC, is a registered art therapist, licensed mental health counselor, and college instructor. She currently works as an adjunct professor in Ursuline College’s Undergraduate Art Therapy Program as well as in Lesley University’s Expressive Therapies PhD Program. Molly earned her bachelor’s degree from Lesley University, where she majored in art therapy with a minor in psychology. After graduating from Ursuline College’s Counseling and Art Therapy Graduate Program, Molly then returned to Lesley University to earn her doctoral degree in Expressive Therapies. Her doctoral research focused on psychosocial implications of medical illness and the role of art therapy in assessment, treatment, and management of medically related issues. Her clinical experience has included work with individuals, families, and groups in community mental health, hospital, school, rehabilitation, and studio settings.

        Molly’s areas of expertise are centered on using mind-body oriented art therapy approaches to identify, examine, and alter maladaptive thoughts and behaviors in an effort toward achieving wholeness and balance. Her current clinical and research interests include: arts therapies in healthcare and medicine; trauma-informed therapeutic practices; and the arts and human development.

      1. N/NY-0111 - Mechanism of Improvement with Art Therapy During Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD

        Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

        This course will discuss effects of art therapy in conjunction with Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) for reduction of PTSD symptoms in combat veterans. It will inform attendees of quantitative and qualitative outcomes that demonstrate greater reduction in PTSD symptoms in those who received adjunctive art therapy compared to CPT.

        Description

        This course will discuss effects of art therapy in conjunction with Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) for reduction of PTSD symptoms in combat veterans. It will inform attendees of quantitative and qualitative outcomes that demonstrate greater reduction in PTSD symptoms in those who received adjunctive art therapy compared to CPT.

        Learning Objectives
          1. Name at least three specific art therapy directives which can be used in the treatment of PTSD with art therapy.
          2. Articulate which quantitative evidence that demonstrates that art therapy is a useful adjunctive therapy for PTSD.
          3. Name at least four benefits cited by patients with PTSD who have received art therapy.

          Dr. Sarah Deaver

          Sarah Deaver, PhD, ATR-BC, HLM,  has been an art therapy educator, researcher, and clinician for over 30 years.  Currently in private practice, she was  professor in the EVMS School of Health Professions and Department of Psychiatry. She has been involved in several cross-discipline research efforts, and has published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals. She has served the profession of art therapy as a Director on the ATCB, Chair of the AATA Research Committee, and Director on the AATA Board. She was President of the American Art Therapy Association from 2013-2015, and represented the association at the 2017 Creative Forces: NEA Military Healing Arts Network Clinical Research Summit.

          Dr. Kathleen Decker

          Psychiatrist, Hampton VA Medical Center

          Dr. Decker, MD, DFAPA attended Stanford University for medical, graduate school, and post-doctoral fellowship. She is a psychiatrist at Hampton VAMC and a faculty member at Eastern Virginia Medical School.  She is a Distinguished Fellow of APA.  Her research interests include novel treatments for PTSD and substance use disorder including Art Therapy.

        1. N/NY-0112 - Stay With the Image: Heuristic Inquiry Grounded in Art

          Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

          The presenter will share a particular method of art-based research uniquely suited to artists and designed to address research questions related to human experience. Drawing heavily from Hillman, Moustakas and McNiff, a theoretical orientation grounded in art that honors the autonomy and intent of images themselves will be presented.

          Description

          The presenter will share a particular method of art-based research uniquely suited to artists and designed to address research questions related to human experience. Drawing heavily from Hillman, Moustakas and McNiff, a theoretical orientation grounded in art that honors the autonomy and intent of images themselves will be presented.

          Learning Objectives
          1. Compare and contrast the basic purpose and design of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies with art based heuristic inquiry.
          2. Name at least 3 of Moustakas' 6 stages of heuristic inquiry.
          3. Define the concept of the "Third" in psychotherapy and in art-based research.

          Dr. Haley Fox

          Assistant Professor, Adler University

          Dr. Haley Fox, PhD, ATR-BC, ATCS, LMHC, LPCC, MT-BC, REAT has been a practicing artist-psychotherapist, clinical supervisor singer-songwriter, and public speaker for nearly 30 years. She currently serves on the core faculty in Counseling: Art Therapy at Adler University in Chicago. Her special academic interests include archetypal psychology, sexuality, intermodal expressive arts therapy, and art-based research.

        2. N/NY-0113 - Rhizomatic, Nomadic Approach in Art Therapy

          Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

          The presentation describes arts-based doctoral research informed by Deleuze and Guattari’s philosophy, particularly their figurations of rhizome and nomad. Rhizomatic, Nomadic Approach was developed as the application of their work in art therapy. Arts-based methodology results included concepts of affect, percept, poetics of intersubjectivities, and the experience of creativity development.

          Description

          The presentation describes arts-based doctoral research informed by Deleuze and Guattari’s philosophy, particularly their figurations of rhizome and nomad. Rhizomatic, Nomadic Approach was developed as the application of their work in art therapy. Arts-based methodology results included concepts of affect, percept, poetics of intersubjectivities, and the experience of creativity development.

          Learning Objectives
            1. Describe how the arts-based methodology was used to support research and evaluation in art therapy.
            2. Define the contemporary philosophy of Deleuze and Guattari, with key concepts of rhizome and nomad, and the growing influence of their work in the field of humanities and social sciences.
            3. Articulate how the contemporary philosophy of Deleuze and Guattari was applied into practice with four different populations in four settings.

            Dr. Mitra Reyhani Dejkameh

            NYS Office of Mental Health, Sagamore Children's Psychiatric Center

            Dr. Mitra Reyhani Dejkameh, LCAT, ATR-BC, is a New York State licensed and board certified creative arts therapist. She has recently launched the Creatives Arts Department at NYS Office of Mental Health at Sagamore Children's Psychiatric Center were she works with children ages 6-17. She also provides monthly art therapy services at Mount Sinai South Nassau Hospital's adult inpatient behavioral unit, teaches at Hofstra University. She has several years of experience working with individuals of all ages in museum based and clinical settings. Mitra is an Iranian American visual and video artist. She works to increase the scope and diversity of populations served with the ongoing objective of making individual realities more visible in public discourse. Mitra has an MFA in Visual Arts, and MA in Creative Arts Therapy, and a doctorate in Art Therapy.

          1. N/NY-0114 - Research in Transitions: Narrative Art Therapy, Aging, and Perimenopause

            Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

            This course explores research about how women use a variety of narratives to navigate the transition of menopause. This presentation includes the overview of the literature review of dominant bio-medical and feminist narratives, the mixed-methods design used, and qualitative and quantitative results of a 6-week art therapy group with eight participants.

            Description

            This course explores research about how women use a variety of narratives to navigate the transition of menopause. This presentation includes the overview of the literature review of dominant bio-medical and feminist narratives, the mixed-methods design used, and qualitative and quantitative results of a 6-week art therapy group with eight participants.

            Learning Objectives
              1. Define perimenopause.
              2. Identify the two main discourses on menopause in the current literature.
              3. Identify three benefits of discussing distress related to perimenopause with their clients.

              Gwen Wilson

              Gwen Wilson, MA, LMHCA, MHP, earned her MA in Counseling and Art Therapy from Antioch University Seattle in 2016. She currently practices as a Mental Health Counselor in a setting where she provides behavioral health counseling to an adult population using strength-based, person-centered solution focused interventions, art therapy and motivational interviewing to facilitate behavior change.

            1. N/NY-0115 - Common Landscapes: The Joint Painting Procedure in Research and Dyadic Art Psychotherapy

              Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

              This course describes the joint painting procedure as a validated assessment for implicit aspects of the relationship between mothers and children in middle childhood. The course focuses on research and the clinical aspects of the joint painting procedure as a transformative intervention in parent-child art psychotherapy.

              Description

              This course describes the joint painting procedure as a validated assessment for implicit aspects of the relationship between mothers and children in middle childhood. The course focuses on research and the clinical aspects of the joint painting procedure as a transformative intervention in parent-child art psychotherapy.

              Learning Objectives
                1. Identify measuring interactions within the joint painting process and the artistic product.
                2. Name an art-based intervention in parent-child art psychotherapy.
                3. Identify mixed method research in the art therapy field.

                Dr. Tami Gavron

                Art Therapist, Tel-Hai College and University of Haifa

                Dr. Tami Gavron, PhD, Art Therapist, Psychotherapist, Supervisor and an educator. Teaching at Tel-Hai college and at the Graduate School of creative art therapies, University of Haifa, Israel. Private practice, Galilee. Main Interests: Parent-Child art psychotherapy, Art-Based supervision, Art-Based assessments.

              1. N/NY-0116 - Art Therapy for Chronic Stress

                Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

                Using findings from two mixed methods experimental studies conducted by the authors, the presentation will highlight the unique contributions of art therapy for adults facing chronic stress. Data include self-report, artwork, standardized measures of psychological well-being and salivary biomarkers.

                Description

                Using findings from two mixed methods experimental studies conducted by the authors, the presentation will highlight the unique contributions of art therapy for adults facing chronic stress. Data include self-report, artwork, standardized measures of psychological well-being and salivary biomarkers.

                Learning Objectives
                  1. Identify how chronic stress is manifested in the body through salivary biomarkers like cortisol, norepinephrine, amylase, epinephrine and dopamine.
                  2. Identify how chronic stress affects immune functions including biomarker cytokines like TNF alpha, IL-10 and IL6.
                  3. Name mixed method approaches to research and evaluation.

                  Dr. Girija Kaimal

                  Assistant Professor, Drexel University

                  Dr. Girija Kaimal (EdD, MA, ATR-BC) is Assistant Professor in the doctoral program in Creative Arts therapies at Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions. She has Bachelor's degree in design from the National Institute of Design in India; Masters degree in art therapy from Drexel University; and; her doctorate is in human development and psychology from the Harvard University Graduate School of Education. She also serves as the Chair of the AATA Research Committee and is an Assessment Fellow for Drexel University

                1. N/NY-0312 - Creative Energy: Treating Suicidal Behavior with Art Therapy

                  Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

                  This course features a case study that explores the collective efforts of a therapist and client using the power of the creative process to transform a client repeatedly engaging in suicidal acts into a person with the desire to live life fully!

                  Description

                  This course features a case study that explores the collective efforts of a therapist and client using the power of the creative process to transform a client repeatedly engaging in suicidal acts into a person with the desire to live life fully!

                  Learning Objectives
                    1. Describe the advantages of integrating art therapy and DBT when working with patients having suicidal urges/behaviors.
                    2. Identify 3 treatment issues in working with patients who have chronic suicidal thinking, urges and behaviors.
                    3. Identify specific art therapy exercises to use when working with patients experiencing suicidal thinking/urges/behaviors.

                    Jane DeSouza

                    Director for Personalized Recovery Oriented Services, Saint Vincent's Hospital Westchester

                    Jane DeSouza, MPS, ATR-BC, LCAT has worked at Saint Vincent's Hospital Westchester since 1980: current Director for Personalized Recovery Oriented Services.  She is a Certified DBT Team Therapist, previous instructor for NYS CASAC curriculum and received post-masters training at the Institute for Expressive Analysis.  She received the 1999 Outstanding Clinician Award and in 2015 awarded Honorary Life Member for the Westchester Art Therapy Association. In 2016 she received the AATA Presidential Honor for her work at Conference Chair.

                  1. N/NY-0205 - The Burma Project: Journeys to a Different Landscape

                    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

                    A panel of art therapists with the Art Therapy Institute of North Carolina shares their experiences of utilizing art therapy with refugees from Burma who have resettled in the Triangle area of North Carolina. Together they find creative ways in which to address the mental health needs of this population.

                    Description

                    A panel of art therapists with the Art Therapy Institute of North Carolina shares their experiences of utilizing art therapy with refugees from Burma who have resettled in the Triangle area of North Carolina. Together they find creative ways in which to address the mental health needs of this population.

                    Learning Objectives
                      1. Examine the ongoing ethnic conflict in Burma and be able to describe how this situation has led to substantial refugee populations in both Thailand and in the United States–most specifically, in the Triangle Area.
                      2. Name at least three medical and mental health concerns plaguing the refugees in the Triangle area, as well as identify at least three barriers to seeking out and receiving the medical and mental health counseling these refugees need.
                      3. Identify and evaluate the effectiveness of at least three art therapy directives used with this specific population.

                      Eva Miller

                      Co-Founder, North Carolina Art Therapy Institute

                      In addition to being one of the co-founders of the N.C. Art Therapy Institute, Eva Miller, MPS, ATR, LPCS currently facilitates art therapy groups for women with eating disorders, adults with acquired brain injury, and refugee children.  She also directs the recreation program at a local healthcare & rehabilitation center in Raleigh, NC. 

                      Kristin Linton

                      Organizing Founder, North Carolina Art Therapy Institute

                      Kristin Linton, MA, LPC, an organizing founder of the Art Therapy Institute, has worked to promote awareness of the field, access to services, and educational trainings. Currently she is working on the Burma Project in the Chapel Hill schools where she is also the district art therapist for the Exceptional Needs Program.

                      Dr. Hilary Rubesin

                      Executive Director, North Carolina Art Therapy Institute

                      Hillary Rubesin, PhD, MA, LPCANC, LPCS, LPC, is the Executive Director of the North Carolina Art Therapy Institute where she manages community engagement and education, facilitates outpatient expressive arts groups, and school and community expressive therapy sessions, as well as coordinates treatment with families, translators, teacher, school administrators, medical clinics and resettlement agencies for refugees. She also provides clinical supervision and administration for LPC interns, research and public health interns. She serves as a peer reviewer for Arts in Psychotherapy, a professional journal

                      Ilene Sperling

                      Ilene Sperling, MA, LPC, ATR  is a master's level art therapist and the clinical director of the Institute in North Carolina. She has experience working with diverse populations of various ages in inpatient psychiatric units for children and adolescents, public schools, day treatment mental health centers, childcare settings, and private practice.