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  • N/NY-ET6047 - From Private to Public: #Metoo and Beyond - Ethics and Value of Sharing Art

    Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Does sharing artwork created in private stimulate post-traumatic growth? This presentation will examine research evidence that will redefine the treatment to consider the benefits of extending treatment beyond the creation and private discussion of art that is created for trauma resolution. Insights from the #metoo movement to implications in clinical practice will be discussed.

    Description

    Does sharing artwork created in private stimulate post-traumatic growth? This presentation will examine research evidence that will redefine the treatment to consider the benefits of extending treatment beyond the creation and private discussion of art that is created for trauma resolution. Insights from the #metoo movement to implications in clinical practice will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives
    1. Participants will define the reintegration stage of trauma treatment
    2. Participants will describe three implications of sharing work/story publicly
    3. Participants will apply a model to clinical practice to determine when it is beneficial for clients to share

    Mary Andrus

    Dr. Andrus, PhD, ATR-BC, LCPC, LPC, spearheaded the historic legislation for art therapy in the state of Oregon. Her research is focused on reintegration of trauma and the ethics of sharing artwork publicly. She is an educator, leader and practitioner with a passion for empowering others through creativity.

  • N/NY-FS9024 - Extending the Sentence: Arts in Corrections Yesterday, Prison Art Therapy Programs Tomorrow

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Relying on personal experiences, research, prison art, and vignettes obtained through discussions with art therapists and prison inmates from around the world, this psycho-historical examination of art and art therapy in corrections will provide the scaffolding on which future programs can be built.

    Description

    Relying on personal experiences, research, prison art, and vignettes obtained through discussions with art therapists and prison inmates from around the world, this psycho-historical examination of art and art therapy in corrections will provide the scaffolding on which future programs can be built.

    Learning Objectives
    1. Participants will be able to identify how arts in corrections programs informed and supported current and future art therapy programs
    2. Participants will be able to identify several different types of research studies underscoring the effectiveness of art and art therapy in corrections
    3. Participants will be able to articulate strategies and guidelines for setting up art therapy in prison programs

    Dr. David Gussak

    David Gussak, PhD, ATR-BC is Professor for the Florida State University art therapy program. Dave has published and presented extensively on art therapy and corrections. He authored "Art on Trial" and "Art and Art Therapy with the Imprisoned: Re-Creating Identity" and co-edited the "Wiley Handbook of Art Therapy".

  • N/NY-MS6121 - Art Therapy’s Role Within Trans-disciplinary Teams at a Pediatric Rehabilitation Center

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This presentation describes art therapy’s role in trans-disciplinary teams working with toddlers with acquired brain injury and pre-schoolers within the autism spectrum. Promoting biopsychosocial treatment goals, art therapy accommodates individual functioning. Sensory- and play-based art therapy allows toddlers to self-express while communicating through kinesthetic, visual, olfactory, and auditory realms.

    Description

    This presentation describes art therapy’s role in trans-disciplinary teams working with toddlers with acquired brain injury and pre-schoolers within the autism spectrum. Promoting biopsychosocial treatment goals, art therapy accommodates individual functioning. Sensory- and play-based art therapy allows toddlers to self-express while communicating through kinesthetic, visual, olfactory, and auditory realms.

    Learning Objectives
    1.  Participants will be able to list at least three therapy goals as part of a trans-disciplinary team working with toddlers with acquired brain injury in an outpatient medical setting
    2. Participants will be able to list at least three art therapy treatment goals as part of a trans-disciplinary team working with preschoolers within the autism spectrum in an outpatient medical setting
    3. Participants will be able to understand at least three sensory and play based milieu art therapy experientials used with toddlers with acquired brain injury and preschoolers within the autism spectrum within an outpatient medical setting

    Dr. Julie Moreno

    Dr. Julie Moreno, PhD, ATR, LPC graduated with a Master of Counseling/Art Therapy degree from Wayne State University and completed her PhD in Counseling with a cognate in Rehabilitation Counseling. As a graduate student in the College of Education program she maintained a 4.0 GPA and received Graduate Professional and College of Education Scholarships. She is currently employed as a senior art therapist for C.S. Mott Children's hospital for University of Michigan Health System and is also part time faculty in the College of Education Counseling and Art Therapy Divisions at Wayne State University. She has been awarded University of Michigan Health System "Making a Difference" acknowledgements for her work in outpatient pediatrics.

    In the past and present, Julie has worked with children with autism, visual impairments, cognitive and emotional impairments, and severe multiple impairments. In addition, Julie has used counseling and art therapy with adults with developmental disabilities, substance abuse, and traumatic brain Injury. Julie hopes to continue to explore the effects of counseling and art therapy on overall functioning. She feels fortunate to witness the positive outcomes of counseling, creativity and therapeutic expressive arts based interventions on the quality of life of individuals with physical, emotional and cognitive challenges.

  • N/NY-MS6170 - Art Therapy as Palliative Care from Diagnosis to End of Life

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A four-year old boy’s cancer returned after multiple courses of treatment, and ultimately claimed his life. Using a four-stage model from the pediatric cancer literature, this presentation will explore art therapy as an integrated, palliative component of cancer care.

    Description

    A four-year old boy’s cancer returned after multiple courses of treatment, and ultimately claimed his life. Using a four-stage model from the pediatric cancer literature, this presentation will explore art therapy as an integrated, palliative component of cancer care.

    Learning Objectives

    Objective 1: Participants will be able to list at least three therapy goals as part of a trans-disciplinary team working with toddlers with acquired brain injury in an outpatient medical setting

    Objective 2: Participants will be able to list at least three art therapy treatment goals as part of a trans-disciplinary team working with preschoolers within the autism spectrum in an outpatient medical setting

    Objective 3: Participants will be able to understand at least three sensory and play based milieu art therapy experientials used with toddlers with acquired brain injury and preschoolers within the autism spectrum within an outpatient medical setting

    Emotional Risk Description

    This presentation is a case study about how art therapy supported a four-year old boy who died of cancer and his family. It is possible that the content of this presentation might evoke sadness and other difficult emotions in attendees.

    Tracy Councill

    Program Director, Tracy's Kids

    Tracy Councill, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT is both Program Director for Tracy's Kids and Art Therapist in Pediatric Hematology-Oncology at Georgetown University Hospital's Lombardi Cancer Center. She has taught Medical Art Therapy, Studio Art Therapy and Art Therapy for Trauma at The George Washington University, Eastern Virginia Medical School, and Florida State University and creates paintings, block prints and sculpture. She has served as on the Board of AATAand as Chair of the Membership Committee

    Kristin Ramsey

    Kristin Ramsey, MA, ATR, RYT-500, is a practicing art therapist and therapeutic yoga instructor. Kristin has experience providing art and yoga therapy to various populations and is currently working with Tracy’s Kids at Georgetown University Hospital providing art therapy to pediatric oncology patients and their families.

  • N/NY-PS6159 - Better Together: Using Family to Engage a Client in Art Therapy

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    When a client has left treatment, the task of encouraging them to return is the ultimate challenge. This presentation details one case example of utilizing a family unit to engage the client into meaningful art making and discovery. Further explored is the impact of the therapeutic alliance, rupture, and repair.

    Description

    When a client has left treatment, the task of encouraging them to return is the ultimate challenge. This presentation details one case example of utilizing a family unit to engage the client into meaningful art making and discovery. Further explored is the impact of the therapeutic alliance, rupture, and repair.

    Learning Objectives
    1. Describe one or more therapeutic interventions that were employed during the course of treatment for this client.
    2. Identify two or more clinical applications of engaging with a client’s family unit and including them in treatment.
    3. Identify one or more examples of multidisciplinary teamwork which could be used to engage the client in art therapy.

    Kathryn Harmon

    Art Therapist at HELP-USA in New York City. Spent my childhood in Senegal and now live in New York. Still transitioning from the Sahara to the Manhattan. Currently using my art history background by spending every day making art, looking at art, and enjoying art.

    Bethany Altschwager

    Bethany Altschwager is a licensed art therapist working in New York. Building on her background in arts education her clinical experience includes art therapy with children, adolescents, adults, and families in school, after-school, clubhouse, and psychiatric settings.

  • N/NY-RE6043 - Art Therapy for Patients Undergoing Radiation and Their Caregivers

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this presentation, we will present findings from a mixed methods multi-site experimental study examining physical and psychological outcomes of a brief art therapy session for individuals undergoing going radiation oncology treatment, and their caregivers. Approaches to art therapy research including biomarkers, like cortisol and dopamine, will be shared.

    Description

    In this presentation, we will present findings from a mixed methods multi-site experimental study examining physical and psychological outcomes of a brief art therapy session for individuals undergoing going radiation oncology treatment, and their caregivers. Approaches to art therapy research including biomarkers, like cortisol and dopamine, will be shared.

    Learning Objectives
      1. Participants will learn about how art therapy impacts biomarkers like cortisol, norepinephrine, IL-6, dopamine, and epinephrine.
      2. Participants will learn about how art therapy can help patients and caregivers undergoing radiation oncology treatment.
      3. Participants will learn about mixed method experimental studies with individuals undergoing radiation oncology treatment and their caregivers.

      Katrina Carroll-Haskins

      Katrina Carroll-Haskins is an art therapist and educator. She is currently a PhD candidate and research fellow at Drexel University. She has worked therapeutically with groups and individuals diagnosed with autism, dementia, intellectual disabilities, chemical dependency, eating disorders, trauma, and sexual offenses. Her research interests include art-based supervision, professional identity development for art therapists, and innovative technologies (VR, AR) and their applications to art therapy practice

      Dr. Girija Kaimal

      Assistant Professor, Drexel University

      Dr. Girija Kaimal (EdD, MA, ATR-BC) is Assistant Professor in the doctoral program in Creative Arts therapies at Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions. She has Bachelor's degree in design from the National Institute of Design in India; Masters degree in art therapy from Drexel University; and; her doctorate is in human development and psychology from the Harvard University Graduate School of Education. She also serves as the Chair of the AATA Research Committee and is an Assessment Fellow for Drexel University

      Jessica Drass

      Jessica Masino Drass is a PhD Student and Research Fellow at Drexel University. She was previously an art therapist at a DBT-based womens trauma partial hospital program and a high school art teacher. She also has a Masters in School Psychology and owns a community art studio, Wise Mind Creations

    1. N/NY-RE6189 - A Revitalized Synthesis: Art Therapy, Neuroscience and Mobile Brain-Body Imaging

      Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

      In this session we will discuss the trans-disciplinary research on how brain science and artistic processes inform one another to support the overall health and amelioration of disease. Studying the biological basis of creative arts and neuroscience through the use of Brain-Computer Interface and Mobile Brain-Body Imaging (MoBI) techniques will promote a greater understanding for the capacities of art therapy to be considered an effective and data-driven medical and mental health profession

      Description

      In this session we will discuss the trans-disciplinary research on how brain science and artistic processes inform one another to support the overall health and amelioration of disease. Studying the biological basis of creative arts and neuroscience through the use of Brain-Computer Interface and Mobile Brain-Body Imaging (MoBI) techniques will promote a greater understanding for the capacities of art therapy to be considered an effective and data-driven medical and mental health profession

      Learning Objectives
        1. Define Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) and Mobile Brain-Body Imaging (MoBI)
        2. Identify three ways that advanced neuroimaging can be used as a tool in research on the brain and art therapy
        3. Identify three challenges with using neuroimaging technology in art therapy research

        Juliet King

        Associate Professor, The George Washington University

        Juliet L. King, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LMHC, is an Associate Professor of Art Therapy at The George Washington University and Adjunct Associate Professor at Indiana University School of Medicine; Department of Neurology. Prof. King developed the inaugural graduate art therapy program at the IU Herron School of Art and recently edited and published a textbook: Art Therapy, Trauma and Neuroscience: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives.

      1. N/NY-RE6199 - Supporting Patients with Parkinson’s Disease Through Art Therapy

        Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

        “I still have Parkinson’s but, I am also an artist ...The Parkinson’s piece is no longer right in front.” This controlled exploratory study examined art therapy on symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Neurological, psychological and art therapy assessments were administered. Treatment considerations will be shared for future research.

        Description

        “I still have Parkinson’s but, I am also an artist ...The Parkinson’s piece is no longer right in front.”

        This controlled exploratory study examined art therapy on symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Neurological, psychological and art therapy assessments were administered. Treatment considerations will be shared for future research.

        Learning Objectives
        1. Participants will identify two ways art therapy can enhance the visual spatial functioning for patients with Parkinson’s disease.
        2. Participants will learn clinical considerations for art making for those managing symptoms of stage 2-3 Parkinson’s disease.
        3. Participants will examine the findings of neurological and artistic changes following 10 weeks of group art therapy sessions.

        Dr. Ikuko Acosta

        Ikuko Acosta, PhD, ATR-BC, LCAT has been involved in the field of Art Therapy for the past thirty five years as an art therapist, art therapy educator, and finally as the Director of the Art Therapy Program at NYU. Her clinical expertise is with adult psychiatric population, functioned as a stuff art therapist of a diagnostic team in an admissions unit in a county psychiatric hospital in NJ for 17 years. Her main research interest is to develop an aesthetically based pictorial analysis within a framework of psychodynamic approach as well as incorporating new media for therapeutic use.

        As an art therapy educator, she has trained several hundred students many of whom are practicing art therapists and art therapy educators both in the US and internationally. Her most recent research interest focuses on the cross-cultural application of the field of art therapy as well as incorporating the internship abroad experience into the course curriculum. In the past 6 years many students have participated in such experiences in Tanzania, Peru, South Africa, Brazil, India, and Bolivia. Her interest in global expansion of the field of art therapy took her to places such as Iceland, Italy, Turkey, Japan, Korea, India, Thailand, Singapore, Taiwan and Argentina. In the past she has served for the membership committee, and educational standard committee in the American Art Therapy Associations. She also served as an editorial member of the American Art Therapy Journal.

        Marygrace Berberian

        Marygrace Berberian, MA, MSW, LCAT, ATR-BC, LCSW, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Graduate Art Therapy Program at New York University. Marygrace has established school based art therapy initiatives throughout New York City for at-risk children and families for almost 20 years. Ms. Berberian is also the Director of NYU Art Therapy in the Schools program. She led a research initiative examining the impact of art therapy on the self-esteem, affect regulation and impulse control of public school students. She has published work on the use of art therapy for post disaster recovery and also implications for cross-cultural practice. Marygrace has presented at interdisciplinary conferences nationally and internationally.

        Marygrace has trained clinicians of other disciplines advocating for the use of the creative arts therapies as a highly efficient treatment modality. She formerly developed and directed the creative arts therapy program at several community based agencies, working with children and adolescents at risk, formerly homeless and mentally ill adults and survivors of cancer. Ms. Berberian is also trained as a Sandplay Therapy Practioner and maintains a private practice in Park Slope, Brooklyn. Currently, Marygrace is a student in the PhD Creative Arts Therapies Program at Drexel University examining artwork created by military service members.

      2. N/NY-SC5160 - Self-Care for Caregivers: Building Resilience through Art and Community

        Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

        Partnering with staff from an agency serving survivors of domestic sex trafficking, a doctoral art therapy cohort implemented psychoeducation and art-based workshops addressing the self-care needs of agency caregivers. Workshops identified caregiver needs and provided opportunities to explore shared experiences. The panel will present findings from empirical and heuristic research.​

        Description

        Partnering with staff from an agency serving survivors of domestic sex trafficking, a doctoral art therapy cohort implemented psychoeducation and art-based workshops addressing the self-care needs of agency caregivers. Workshops identified caregiver needs and provided opportunities to explore shared experiences. The panel will present findings from empirical and heuristic research.

        Learning Objectives
          1. Attendees will be able to define the components of compassion fatigue associated with caregivers providing care to individuals who are victims and survivors of domestic sex trafficking.
          2. Attendees will be able to identify the elements of self-care that contribute to caregiver compassion satisfaction.
          3. Attendees will identify four group art directives that advance the knowledge base of effective community art-based practices that introduce new strategies for addressing self-care needs.

          Deborah Sharpe

          Deborah Sharpe, MA, ATR-BC, has a master’s degree in art therapy from New York University and has practiced art therapy for 25 years. She is an associate part time faculty at Saint Mary’s College and NDNU. She is currently a PhD candidate. Deborah serves on the ATCB board of directors

          Jennifer Clay

          Jennifer is a licensed MFT currently applying for ATR registration. She received her MA in art therapy from Notre Dame de Namur University and is a PhD candidate in their doctoral program. As a Choctaw tribal member, her focus has been with American Indian/Hawaiian families and issues of historical/transgenerational trauma.

          Dr. Deanna Mank

          The focus of my work is to facilitate successful aging and assist individuals with serious and chronic mental illness develop and utilize coping skills based in the creative arts. Therapeutic modalities based in art and music are utilized. My credentials include a PhD, registered and board certified in Art Therapy and licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. I also am a Certified Trauma Professional.

        1. N/NY-TA6205 - Revising the FEATS Manual to Make a More Reliable Instrument

          Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

          Presenters will reveal revisions to the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale Manual (FEATS) called for through evidence-based research over the past 20 years. Researchers will learn how to strengthen interrater reliability when using the instrument. The paper will outline best-practices for future research design and clinical use of the FEATS

          Description

          Presenters will reveal revisions to the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale Manual (FEATS) called for through evidence-based research over the past 20 years. Researchers will learn how to strengthen interrater reliability when using the instrument. The paper will outline best-practices for future research design and clinical use of the FEATS

          Learning Objectives
            1. Attendees will be able to state at least three changes that are being made in the upcoming revision of The FEATS Rating Manual and be able to discuss why those changes are important to the use of the FEATS in the future.
            2. Attendees will be able to name at least three ways to strengthen interrater reliability when using the FEATS.
            3. Attendees will be able to list at least three effective ways to implement the revised FEATS Rating Manual in both clinical and research applications.

            Amy Bucciarelli

            Amy Bucciarelli, MS, ATR-BC, LMHC, is a faculty member for the University of Florida's Center for Arts in Medicine. Amy's clinical experience focuses on medical art therapy. She has published and presented about assessments, mandalas, practitioner self-care, the therapeutic use of hand papermaking, and the collaboration of creative arts therapies and arts in medicine programs.

            Dr. Linda Gantt

            Linda Gantt, PhD, ATR-BC, HLM, is the co-owner of the ITR Training Institute, Morgantown, WV. She has presented nationally and internationally on art therapy in trauma treatment and the Instinctual Trauma Response as well as on the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale (FEATS) that she and Carmello Tabone developed.